Cultured Coconut Yogurt

Friends, I have been experimenting with fermented foods lately, and I’m having a great time. I’ve been using inexpensive probiotic capsules to get things started – seriously, the cheapest vegan capsules I could find, with the lowest count – and also using the resulting fermented products as starters for other projects. I had one really big failure (turns out almond milk + pea protein smells like death when fermented), and some awesome successes. I count this simple Cultured Coconut Yogurt a success.

Honestly, I’m not so sure this DIY is any cheaper than what you can buy at the store, but the taste is totally different. You can experiment with the texture/thickness by combining coconut cream and coconut milk (or even just using all coconut milk), but I prefer the extra thick, creamy coconut cream. Whatever you choose, make sure it’s full fat as that’s what will work best.

The yogurt starts out a little on the thin side, but will thicken up nicely after it chills in the fridge. I found the taste also matured slightly in the fridge, and I prefer it after it sits a couple days…although I will still start to eat it right after it chills.

Easy Cultured Coconut Yogurt | Orthodox and Vegan
Cultured Coconut Yogurt
1-2 14oz cans coconut cream*
2 vegan probiotic capsules, contents of

Scoop coconut cream into a sterile glass jar, liquid included (the number of cans you use simply depends on the size of the batch you’d like to make). Open probiotic capsules and empty contents into coconut cream, whisk to combine. Cover the mouth of the jar with cheesecloth fastened with string or a rubber band. Leave at room temperature for two to three days, until desired taste is achieved.
*The cans of coconut cream will probably not be exactly 14oz, and that’s okay.

The coconut yogurt should smell like traditional yogurt. If it smells off or looks discolored, DO NOT EAT IT! I haven’t had this happen yet, other than the pea protein incident, but just be aware.

When you’re ready to stop fermenting the yogurt, replace the cheesecloth with a lid and store the jar in the fridge. It should keep for at least week, mine has lasted much longer – just keep an eye on it for mold, and a nose on it for smells 🙂

Enjoy your yogurt on its own, or with fruit, or in a parfait. You may wish to sweeten it with maple syrup or agave nectar, or flavor it with vanilla or lemon. Or leave it plain and use it to make tzatziki or other yogurt sauces. Or, you know, just use it wherever you might use yogurt.

What will you do with yours?